Oluwaseun (Seun) Esan

Sequelae of gastrointestinal infections: incidence, risk factors and economic impact on the National Health Service (NHS) in England

Personal Statement:

Seun began her Tracking disease in the population DPhil studentship ‘Sequelae of gastrointestinal infections: incidence, risk factors and economic impact on the National Health Service (NHS) in England’ in January 2015, with supervisors Thomas Fanshawe, Mara Violato, Noel McCarthy, and Rafael Perera at the University of Oxford. She is a microbiology graduate of the University of Nottingham turned epidemiologist and is currently on a career break from Public Health England to complete her DPhil.

 

She has worked in different arms of Public Health England from improving diagnostics for dengue fever to infectious disease surveillance and outbreak investigation. Outside of work, she enjoys travelling, swimming, spending time with family, baking and inventing “new recipes” when baby and toddler become fussy.

         

 

Olu Esan

Lay Summary:

Gastrointestinal (GI) infections are common. Most GI infections are self-limiting without the need for medical intervention. However, some people develop serious and sometimes life threatening complications such as reactive arthritis (inflammation of joints), irritable bowel syndrome (altered bowel habits fluctuating between constipation and diarrhoea), and Guillain- Barré syndrome (flaccid paralysis) requiring medical intervention.

The incidence of complications following infection across the population and resulting economic impact on primary and secondary healthcare settings has not been described. Known risk factors for GI infection may have a role in the development of complications but current evidence is weak. For example, drugs affecting the acidity of the stomach and antibiotics are thought to increase the risk of GI infection, and perhaps the severity of illness.

Linking patients’ records across primary and secondary care using two large databases (Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) and Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) will allow us to find out how often complications from GI infection occur in both settings. Information about patient characteristics and treatments will allow us to determine possible risk factors. We will also use death registration data to find out how often deaths occur after GI infection, and deprivation data to see if there are any differences between socioeconomic groups.

The results will give us information about how often complications occur after GI infection, how much they cost to the health care system, and guide possible ways to prevent them.

Supervisors:

  • Thomas Fanshawe - Nuffield Dept. of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford
  • Mara Violato - NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Gastrointestinal Infections, University of Oxford
  • Rafael Perera - School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford
  • Noel McCarthy - NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Gastrointestinal Infections, University of Warwick

Publications:

Esan OB., Pearce M., van Hecke O., Roberts N., Collins DRJ., Violato M., McCarthy N., Perera R., Fanshawe TR. Factors Associated with Sequelae of Campylobacter and Non-typhoidal Salmonella Infections: A Systematic Review. EBioMedicine, 2017, 15:100–111
https://www.ebiomedicine.com/article/S2352-3964(16)30585-0/fulltext?cc=y=

Oluwaseun Esan Thomas Fanshawe Mara Violato Noel McCarthy Rafael Perera-Salazar Bespoke linkage of Public Health England laboratory data on gastrointestinal infections to the Clinical Practice Research Datalink: Ethics approval and a study proposal. IJPDS (2017) Issue 1, Vol 1:168, Proceedings of the IPDLN Conference (August 2016)